"Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross" (Colossians 2:14 KJV). In conclusion, we have shown on the “blotting out the handwriting of ordinances” is not the fulfillment of the law. So, in the illustration, Christ would be nailing the memorandum i.e. And Paul is warning them not to return to or be influenced by their old pagan ways the ways of those who hated God's Law and His festivals. Dogmasin simply refers to law (see Strong's Exhaustive Concordance). Colossians 2:14 says Christ blotted out the "handwriting of ordinances that was against us." Christ who knew no sin was made to be sin for us (II Cor. They were ascetic human traditions Paul was striking out against, not God's laws. It was a pagan Roman world, filled with foolish and vain traditions. Indeed! The Scriptures always use exaleipho in reference to wiping away sin, not law. That deliverance occurred through Christ, not at, but through his death. Beware of Philosophy   Now consider Colossians 2:8: "Beware lest any man spoil you through philosophy and vain deceit..." The scripture does not say the Law of God. Continuing: "Which things have indeed a shew of wisdom in will worship" — pagan asceticism "and humility, and neglecting of the body" appearing outwardly humble and self-denying, but inwardly self-righteous — "but are of no value against indulgence of the flesh" (last part from Panin translation). To judge is not to abolish. Colossians 2:14 says Christ blotted out the “handwriting of ordinances that was against us.” This could not refer to the Law of God. They had been following the foul, heathenish practices of the world about them. Join the conversations and discussions on Social Media. Has God's Law been done away? How does Paul use this expression in Colossians? If it abolishes one, it abolishes the other. Did not Jesus put away sin at the cross according to that  paradigm? Simmons’ attempt to make a parallel with this event and what occurred with Christ’s death and believers raises questions. Sins Blotted Out   Let's now see how the context of Colossians proves how this "handwriting of ordinances" refers to the record of our sins. No one shall enter into an eternal rest unless he first, here and now, is willing to enter into the rest of each Sabbath, each seventh day of the week. . In our modern justice systems, a parallel to the "handwriting of ordinances" (King James Version) would be a formal written order of a death sentence issued after the evidence against the accused criminal—in this case, us—had been examined. . ORDINANCES! They had really been forgiven. Some believe these verses prove the Ten Commandments have been abolished. The growing sentiment had its roots partly in the prevailing ideas of contemporary philosophy, which instinctively emphasized strongly the dualism of spirit and matter....    "The Neo-Platonic philosophy of the times, through its doctrine of the purification of the soul by its liberation from the body or sensuous things, taught celibacy and ascetic practices generally" (from pp. Therefore, since they were yet looking forward to their resurrection from sin death (for that is the death they died with Christ in baptism, Rom. wiping out the handwriting in ordinances which was against us; and he has taken it out of the way, nailing it to the cross; Young's Literal Translation having blotted out the handwriting in the ordinances that is against us, that was contrary to us, and he hath taken it out of the way, having nailed it to the cross; Look forward to more studies on blotting out the handwriting of ordinances in future studies. Some take blotting out the handwriting of ordinances to mean that Christ brought and end to the Law of Moses and that following His death, it was no longer in effect. But how was it originally incurred? "Philosophy" included the doctrine that one could pay for his own sins by denying himself the pleasures of the body. "Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross." Did you catch it? Have you ever been frustrated by someone misrepresenting what you said by taking a few words out of context? Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross; CSB He erased the certificate of debt, with its obligations, that was against us and opposed to us, and has taken it away by nailing it to the cross. "Let no man therefore judge you...." Does this say "God has abolished these holy days"? Some take blotting out the handwriting of ordinances to mean that Christ brought and end to the Law of Moses and that following His death, it was no longer in effect. The original Greek for the expression "handwriting of ordinances" is cheirographon tois dogmasin. The original Greek in verse 16 for "meat, or in drink" — en broosei and en posei means "in eating and in drinking." In the debate on the End of Torah with Don Preston, D. By making possible the forgiveness of sin, Christ defeated the purpose of Satan. "And you," Paul continues, "being dead in your sins and the uncircumcision of your flesh" these people were, prior to conversion, uncircumcised Gentiles — "hath he [the Father] quickened together with Him [Christ], having forgiven you all trespasses" (verse 13). Only one festival has been entirely fulfilled in type Passover. This could not refer to the Law of God. These practices were pagan ordinances, or customs of men — based on the commandments and doctrines of pagan speculative philosophy. (Verse 20.) Colossians 2 explains: "In whom [Christ] also ye are circumcised with the circumcision made without hands, in putting off the body of the sins of the flesh by the circumcision of Christ" (verse 11). "Let no man therefore judge you..." in these matters, said Paul, "but [rather] the body of Christ" (Colossians 2:17, last part). This is not true! It does not read "law of Moses," or "works of the law." .” (KJV). 6:10-11), they could only “reckon” themselves dead to sin as an initiatory process and alive to God “through Christ.”. This verse has troubled many. Yet many make Paul just that inconsistent! Even in the New Testament we read the same descriptive language in reference to that law. “Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out … 14 Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his tree (cross); When we are forgiven of our sins, those old traditions, doctrines and ordinances of men which are AGAINST us are taken out of the way. Div., Kurt Simmons seeks to establish this point. But as it establishes one, so it establishes the other as New Testament practice. He recognizes that for the indebted man, the memorandum of debt i.e. The once-pagan Colossians never kept these Holy Days of God before! Christ had defeated sin. But they hadn't found forgiveness. Colossians 2:15 shows how. Did Christ blot out the Law? Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross | Colossians 2:14 (KJV) The mainstream theological system teaches that this verse indicates the ‘Law of God given through Moses’ was nailed to the cross of Jesus, thereby making ‘the Law of Moses’ null and void, and no longer applicable to anyone. The Greek term, “logidzesthe” means to count, reckon, infer, conclude, or presume as in word or thought. Simmons writes:  “The handwriting of ordinances here is not the Ten Commandments as is commonly supposed, but a memorandum, like a mortgage, reciting our debt before the law.